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Author Topic: Tales of the Empire: A Grim Collection of Old Stories from the Imperial Province  (Read 3880 times)

Offline Hooch

  • Posts: 439
  • Formerly Hoochlander
Tales of the Empire: A Grim Collection of Old Stories from the Imperial Provinces.

I, Leopold Veinstammer, Historian at the University of Nuln, have been working on compiling a collection of folk tales from all around our dear Empire, to give us an insight into the minds and thoughts of the different provinces, their beliefs, and their traits.

I have compiled one from each province, and have chosen the one I believe is most valuable to our understanding. They all have a moral that is a meaningful now as it was when they were written.

I cannot take any responsibility for the accuracy of the events detailed in the stories, for they have been told to me by word of mouth, and may have become corrupted over time. Some are clearly fictitious,  detailing superhuman activities, or unnatural occurences.

I have included foot notes with every story, penning my thoughts on the topics contained within.

Leopold Veinstammer.

A Hundred Doors: A Tale of Altdorf


Altdorf is a rich and prosperous place; many important and noble people live in its walls. However, many of these people are often too uptight and haughty for their own good, as this tale tells:

Once, tired with the bad morals in the city, and rife corruption, a priest set out to bring the spirit of Sigmar back to the people, testing their faith and rewarding it. Although the priest himself was rich, he devoted most of it to the poor, funding schemes for the underprivileged.  He wanted others to do the same, and started his quest to do so.

He dressed as a beggar, clad in flea bitten garments and smelling as foul as he could think possible. He still kept his holy symbols though, so people would recognise him as a man of Sigmar. He roamed the streets, begging and eying the corrupt citizens. He saw how they ignored him, and avoided contact with him at any cost.

All day this continued, until the sun set and the watch cam out, lighting the lanterns around the city. This was the perfect time for his test. He travelled to an upmarket area of the city, and began knocking on the doors of the wealthy citizens within them.
He knocked dozens of doors that night, each time being rejected, or not even answered. He saw into the homes of those he asked for shelter from, each had ample space, and lavish decorations. The inhabitants, however, despite his claims he was a priest, would not let him in, telling him to go to one of the sanctuaries for the poor.

Tired, bored and aching he continued for a while longer, until he found one last house, his one hundredth house. Here lived an old couple, the husband a retired jeweller and they let the priest in, their faith in Sigmar being strong.

They offered him food, a chance to wash, and a bed to stay in. He thanked them greatly for their kindness, but each time they refused any favours from him, claiming they did it for Sigmar. However hard the priest tried, they would not accept.

This told him they were the right people. Before his quest he had spoken to Sigmar in a vision, for Sigmar did not approve of the corruption and unkindness in his city either, and he bestowed upon the priest the ability to pardon them from Sigmar’s wrath, and the blessing of being able to join him when they passed away.

For the other, ninety nine unfaithful houses, there was no such blessing. Sigmar called down lightning upon their luxurious homes, causing them to burn with holy fire, one by one. The town watch took a long time to put out the raging inferno, and in that time the precious, but frivolous material possessions of the wealthy families burnt.

The only house that was saved was that of the old pious couple, a rain cloud appeared above their house, keeping it safe from the flames that engulfed the area. They thanked the priest, and thanked Sigmar, vowing to preach his word and pass on this story of their safety, in order to teach all those who have turned from the Lord, to never abandon their faith in him.


Footnote: The moral in this tale is clear, belief in Sigmar will bring deliverance. It also teaches against greed and wealth, showing it souring effects on the people who have both. The events detailed are said to be accurate, but there so many records of fires in the cities history it is not known when this one exactly was. The story is also in a typical Altdorf fashion, and must have been told firstly amongst the poor, for it is scornful towards the rich, which most of the average Altdorfers are.

Hooch

Offline CaptScott

  • Posts: 1198
Cool  :mrgreen: I like the whole foltalke Idea.

I would of preferred it if the priest had donned a utility belt and stalked the night kicking corrupt ass... but thats just me.  :-D
2010 - The year of Empire.
2011 - The year of Empire!

Offline Hooch

  • Posts: 439
  • Formerly Hoochlander
Thanks  :happy:

I've totally ignored this thread, and probably will for the next two months due to exams.

But afterwards I plan to finish the whole collections  :biggriin:

Hooch

Offline wissenlander

  • Posts: 7161
  • The original Graf of Brennenburg
Are you going to go in alphabetical order or are you going to go with how your inspiration takes you?
Me and Wissenlander had babies!

not together.

finding photographic evidense that Wiss smiles is going to be hard...

Offline Hooch

  • Posts: 439
  • Formerly Hoochlander
Alphabetical order methinks

Sorry 'bout that, I guess that means Wissenland are last......

Ah well, saving the best 'til last  :happy:

 :ph34r: Except Hochland are better  :ph34r:

Hooch

Offline wissenlander

  • Posts: 7161
  • The original Graf of Brennenburg
That's what I was afraid of. :ph34r:  It's ok, your exams take precedence.
Me and Wissenlander had babies!

not together.

finding photographic evidense that Wiss smiles is going to be hard...

Offline Hooch

  • Posts: 439
  • Formerly Hoochlander
I found some time today to finish the Averland story. If I get a bit more time it's onto Hochland  :happy:

This story is clearly based on 'The Hair and the Tortoise' by Aesop. This is because I am trying to Empire-ise many folk tales or legends. For example my last story was based partially on the Latin poem 'Baucis et Philemon' by Ovid, but with a fire instead of a flood.

Anyway here is the next part, as told by Leopold Veinstammer:

Heinrich and the Horse: A Tale of Averland

Averland is one of the wealthier provinces of our land, with its trade in horses bringing many riches to it. Naturally, many of the folk stories of the province include these beasts, for they are the life source of the people. Here is one such story:

Once there was a boy, Otto was his name. He was noble of birth, and as such thought himself above the people who worked for him. As an Averlander, he loved nothing better than to ride, the wind in his hair, upon the steeds the land is famous for. Therefore, he spent a lot of time at his father’s stable, tending to the horses, and ordering the stable hands around.

There was one stable boy in particular, Heinrich, who suffered under Otto’s tyrannical orders. He was victimised by Otto, made to do chores no-one else was ever asked to do. However, Heinrich did not pay heed to the cruel noble-boy. Heinrich loved horses, and would have done anything to stay in his job, and most often he did. He longed to ride on the noble steeds, and feel free like them, an opportunity he knew he could never have, being of a low status.

Heinrich tended to Otto’s favourite horse, Himmler, grooming him, feeding him and cleaning up after him everyday. However, his duties were changed when Otto brought in a new stallion, a birthday present from his Uncle in Nuln, and a stallion of the finest calibre.

Over the next months Otto paid no attention to Himmler, but still ordered Heinrich to care for it. However, it did not have the same privileges, the new horse ate the best hay, had the best care, the best stable and the best horseshoes. Himmler became weak due to him receiving no exercise. Heinrich had noticed this and built up the courage to demand something must be done by Otto.

Otto dismissed the stable-boy, for he no longer cared for Himmler, he said he would sell it, as many were needed in the army, or for baggage duties. Heinrich was outraged; he did not want Himmler to live in a life of cruelty and potential death. However, he did not know how to save the horse.

It was then an idea struck him, he would race Otto on Himmler, and if he won, Otto would keep Himmler, and treat him with the same care as the new stallion. Otto agreed, for he saw the stable boy as no threat, he knew the boy had never ridden before. They set the time as dawn the next day.

That night, Heinrich spent all his time with Himmler. He spoke to him, soothed him, pleaded with him to win. At the same time, Otto was feasting and dining, drinking copious amounts of ale, confident he would beat the peasant upstart in whatever conditions.
The next morning, Otto turned up late for the race, looking bleary eyed and dishevelled, in no way fit for a race. However, he was so arrogant, and confident in his inevitable victory, he took the reins of his new stallion anyway.

Heinrich had received a quick lesson in riding, but knew nothing new apart from what he had seen. His only hope was gaining Himmler's trust

When the race started, Otto burst off, galloping as fast as he could off into the horizon. Heinrich however, had to trot, trying to get used to riding a steed. He was so far behind Otto, but kept going.

When Otto had nearly reached the finish point, his nights drinking caught up with him. He decided to have a rest and recover; as he knew the boy would have to be slow. He dismounted his steed, and caught some sleep under a lone oak tree.

Heinrich continued methodically, gaining the trust of Himmler. After a long time Himmler began to go faster, following Heinrich’s commands. Soon they were galloping, and fast catching up with the cocky noble.

Otto was disturbed by a thundering and rumbling in the ground, he woke up to see the stable boy rocket past on Himmler. Hurriedly he mounted his stallion, by in his haste became entangled in the saddle and had to struggle to free himself. He finally broke from his bondage and mounted his horse, racing towards the finish.

However, when he approached the top of the hill before the end, he heard cheering from the spectators, Heinrich had won. He could not believe his misfortune. How could the incompetent stable boy have beaten him? How had his mighty horse lost? How much would it cost to uphold his promise?

Heinrich got what he wanted. Himmler stayed in his care, and he now often rode the horse on the grassy plains. He knew why he had won. It was because he truly cared for the horse, and knew that only by gaining its trust, could he have any chance of doing that, no matter how long that had taken.


Footnote: This story is clearly of Averland stock. However, there are many other stories like it in the other provinces. The moral is obviously one of patience, and the fatal flaw of arrogance. Despite Averland being a predominantly wealthy province, the fact this was written in the favour of the peasant, is only because this is the one passed by word of mouth. There are many other tales like it, sometimes between two nobles, or even two peasants, showing it to be a common Averland narrative.

Hooch

Offline wissenlander

  • Posts: 7161
  • The original Graf of Brennenburg
Oh so heart warming.  Brings a tear to me eye. :blush:
Me and Wissenlander had babies!

not together.

finding photographic evidense that Wiss smiles is going to be hard...